Tag Archives: New York City

The First Signs of Suburban Utopias: From London to America

From the quirky Edward Scissorhands to the drama of Revolutionary Road, the movie industry has made a habit of showcasing the American suburb. Regardless of genre, the picture painted is one of safety and tranquility. Yet these peaceful utopias were not created by Hollywood, as suburban communities have existed in the United States since the mid-19th […]

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In Pictures: An Interactive Map From the Center of Urban Pedagogy on Income Demographics and Rent in New York City

Check out The Center for Urban Pedagogy’s interactive map of New York City and its immediate suburbs. The data tells a similar story to the most recent American Community Surveys, seen here in another interactive map–courtesy of the New York Times. Coupled with the day versus night population data in Manhattan, it’s clear that residents of lower Manhattan […]

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In Pictures: Ten-Year Population Changes in U.S. Cities

All images have been taken from www.datapointed.net and are based on 2010 U.S. Census data. While many of the maps offer little in terms of significant trends, the southern cities of Dallas, Houston, and Atlanta show significant growth along the periphery. The urban core of Chicago also experienced pockets of decline. Blue illustrates population growth and red […]

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News Update: White Flight to American Cities

Suburbanization in the United States began as a middle and upper-class white movement towards the periphery. While the suburbs have experienced an increase in diversity over the last fifty years, the prevailing stereotypes—that of a poor, minority dominated inner city and affluent white periphery—have remained largely intact. Cities are undergoing a transformation, however, as affluent […]

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In Pictures: The Day-Night Population Change of New York City

Not surprisingly, the majority of New York City workers live in the suburbs. Virtually every area in Manhattan experiences significant population declines at night. A few exceptions are evident: the Upper East Side and Lower East Side remain relatively unchanged, while Roosevelt Island actually doubles in size. The average commute time for Manhattan-based workers is […]

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News Update: The Decentralization of Middle-Aged Workers

In a comparison of people aged 25 to 34 in the 2000 census to the same group ten years later (aged 35 to 44 in 2010), the cohort’s presence in suburbia has increased by 12 percent. The same group has experienced a decrease of 22.7 percent in the urban core.  In terms of real population […]

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News Update: United States Population Trends

The 2010 census shows that only 8.6% of population growth—in metro areas with over one million people—occurred in the city cores. Only Boston, Providence, and Oklahoma City experienced faster growth in the city center, while the suburbs are now home to 6 out of 10 Americans. In terms of demographics, suburban minorities have risen from 5% to […]

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The History of Minorities in New York City Suburbia

In the 1820s, Hezekiah Pierrepont created the first American suburb in Brooklyn Heights. Pierrepont—who simply developed sixty acres of land into individual plots—was soon followed by more ambitious architects and developers who created idyllic communities, complete with resort hotels and steamboat service to Manhattan. The communities catered to Manhattan elites who wanted a reprieve from the […]

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