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News Update: The Decentralization of Middle-Aged Workers

In a comparison of people aged 25 to 34 in the 2000 census to the same group ten years later (aged 35 to 44 in 2010), the cohort’s presence in suburbia has increased by 12 percent. The same group has experienced a decrease of 22.7 percent in the urban core.  In terms of real population […]

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News Update: A Brookings Report on the Evolving Landscape of Suburbia

A Brookings Institute conference looks at the evolving landscape of American suburbia. The 2010 U.S. Census reveals that both cities and suburbs are growing at a smaller rate than in the 1990s. The relationship between city and suburban growth within a metropolitan area remains correlated. In other words, the “metropolitan-wide population change—increase, decrease, or stagnation—continue[s] […]

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News Update: The Aging United States Suburbs

The 2010 U.S. Census shows that suburbia is becoming increasingly older, as 40% of suburban residents in the United States are over 45 years old—up from 34% just a decade ago. The trend is not isolated to the suburbs, however, as city residents over 45 years of age has increased from 31% to 35% in the same time […]

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News Update: United States Population Trends

The 2010 census shows that only 8.6% of population growth—in metro areas with over one million people—occurred in the city cores. Only Boston, Providence, and Oklahoma City experienced faster growth in the city center, while the suburbs are now home to 6 out of 10 Americans. In terms of demographics, suburban minorities have risen from 5% to […]

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Suburban Riots in Paris and the Bigger Picture

On October 27, 2005 two French youths of foreign descent were electrocuted in an attempt to escape police in the suburb of Clicly-sous-Bois. Their deaths led to three weeks of riots, as destitute teens from suburban housing projects around Paris damaged 9,000 cars and created over 200 million Euros in damage. Subsequent riots in November […]

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Income Data from the 2009 American Community Survey

In Kenneth Jackson’s Crabgrass Frontier, the author observes that “social change usually begins at the top of society. In the United States, affluent families had the flexibility and the financial resources to move to the urban edges first.” Written in the 1960s, the observation had already been confirmed by multiple economists.  The middle and upper-class […]

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The History of Minorities in New York City Suburbia

In the 1820s, Hezekiah Pierrepont created the first American suburb in Brooklyn Heights. Pierrepont—who simply developed sixty acres of land into individual plots—was soon followed by more ambitious architects and developers who created idyllic communities, complete with resort hotels and steamboat service to Manhattan. The communities catered to Manhattan elites who wanted a reprieve from the […]

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