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The Last Fifty Years: A Brief Look at U.S. Economic Indicators

Ask an American to describe the typical suburb. Responses will include a range of physical attributes from manicured lawns to exclusive subdivisions, yet there is always one prevailing caveat. These peripheral areas are reserved for middle and upper-class families. A combination of personal observations and media-driven stereotypes have placed this image–or a similar variation–in the minds […]

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In Pictures: An Interactive Map From the Center of Urban Pedagogy on Income Demographics and Rent in New York City

Check out The Center for Urban Pedagogy’s interactive map of New York City and its immediate suburbs. The data tells a similar story to the most recent American Community Surveys, seen here in another interactive map–courtesy of the New York Times. Coupled with the day versus night population data in Manhattan, it’s clear that residents of lower Manhattan […]

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In Pictures: Ten-Year Population Changes in U.S. Cities

All images have been taken from www.datapointed.net and are based on 2010 U.S. Census data. While many of the maps offer little in terms of significant trends, the southern cities of Dallas, Houston, and Atlanta show significant growth along the periphery. The urban core of Chicago also experienced pockets of decline. Blue illustrates population growth and red […]

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In Pictures: The Day-Night Population Change of New York City

Not surprisingly, the majority of New York City workers live in the suburbs. Virtually every area in Manhattan experiences significant population declines at night. A few exceptions are evident: the Upper East Side and Lower East Side remain relatively unchanged, while Roosevelt Island actually doubles in size. The average commute time for Manhattan-based workers is […]

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Income Data from the 2009 American Community Survey

In Kenneth Jackson’s Crabgrass Frontier, the author observes that “social change usually begins at the top of society. In the United States, affluent families had the flexibility and the financial resources to move to the urban edges first.” Written in the 1960s, the observation had already been confirmed by multiple economists.  The middle and upper-class […]

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